November 2016

February 03, 2017: Dr. Kim Arvidsson from Schreiner University

Novice Meeting: 7:00PM
Novice Meeting Topic: 
Light Pollution: How to Light Your Home for Astronomy
Novice Meeting Speaker: 
Debbie Moran
General Meeting: 8:00PM
General Meeting Topic: 
The Birth of Stars
General Meeting Speaker: 
Dr. Kim Arvidsson, Schreiner University
About the General Meeting Presentation

Kim Arvidsson at Loftis Observatory

How are stars born? Why do they come in different colors? Why are they even born in the first place? In this talk, Dr. Arvidsson will be giving an overview of the conditions and the processes that go into making a star. He will be discussing stellar nurseries, their complex and diverse nature, and how that results in different kinds of stars being born.

Kim Arvidsson is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Schreiner University, where he is also the director for the Loftis Observatory. He was previously a postdoctoral researcher at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, IL. He received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Iowa State University, and his undergraduate degree in Physics from Lund University in Sweden.

Parking and Directions (View Map)

Meetings are held in the Science & Research building at the University of Houston Main Campus. The novice meeting is in room 116, the general meeting is in room 117.

NOTE NEW PARKING INFORMATION: Parking is available in lot 15C. Refer to the Google Map below for directions. This parking is available from 6:30 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. on the Friday night of the HAS meeting.

This parking is free. If you get a notice from the UH campus police on the night of the meeting, call the UH Security office and let them know that this area has been made available on HAS meeting night by the Parking Department.


Map to Parking

January 06, 2017: Tour the Texas Star Party with Steve Goldberg

Novice Meeting: 7:00PM
Novice Meeting Topic: 
Winter Observing
Novice Meeting Speaker: 
Debbie Moran
General Meeting: 8:00PM
General Meeting Topic: 
The Texas Star Party: Where is it? What is it?
General Meeting Speaker: 
Steve Goldberg
About the General Meeting Presentation

Steve Goldberg

Many of us have not been able to fit a trip to West Texas into our schedule yet. Some of us are new members and want to know what it’s all about. And others of us want to relive the experience in anticipation of TSP 2017. Take a tour of one of the best star parties in the nation with our own Steve Goldberg! 

At the Novice Session
Debbie will acquaint us with the celestial attractions of the season. You’ll also learn how to stay warm while observing them.

Parking and Directions (View Map)

Meetings are held in the Science & Research building at the University of Houston Main Campus. The novice meeting is in room 116, the general meeting is in room 117.

NOTE NEW PARKING INFORMATION: Parking is available in lot 15C. Refer to the Google Map below for directions. This parking is available from 6:30 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. on the Friday night of the HAS meeting.

This parking is free. If you get a notice from the UH campus police on the night of the meeting, call the UH Security office and let them know that this area has been made available on HAS meeting night by the Parking Department.


Map to Parking

Outreach: Seven Reasons to Volunteer

Original article appears in GuideStar November, 2016.

Outreach benefits YOU. Joe Khalaf gives seven reasons why participating in HAS outreach events can help you become a better astronomer.

  1. You will have an excuse to observe when you can't make it to the club's dark site
  2. Outreach will make you (yes you) a better astronomer
  3. You will get to learn from others
  4. You can use the time at the outreach event to work on your astronomical league challenges
  5. There is an astronomical league award for outreach
  6. You can test out that new telescope or eyepiece you've considered buying
  7. You'll get a lot back in sharing your time, skill, and talents with others

Intrigued? Take a look at Joe’s article in the November 2016 GuideStar.

Shallow Sky Object of the Month: The Clear Daytime Sky

Original article appears in GuideStar November, 2016.

HoustonSky.PNGby Bill Pellerin

Object: The Clear Daytime Sky
Optics needed: Unaided eye

Why is the sky blue instead of some other color, or no color? Most of us know why, in general, the sky is blue, don’t we?  The short, quick answer is that it has something to do with the scattering of blue light from the by the atmosphere.

SO, WHAT HAPPENS BETWEEN THE TIME THE LIGHT LEAVES THE PHOTOSPHERE OF THE SUN AND THE TIME IT REACHES US? THE MOST SIGNIFICANT EVENT IN THAT JOURNEY IS THE LAST 10 OR 20 MILES OF ITS TRIP, IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF PLANET EARTH.

Light of different colors is electromagnetic radiation of different wavelengths. You may remember the name Roy G. Biv from school… the name was to help you remember...

On hiatus

Observatory Corner

Original article appears in GuideStar November, 2016.

New Bunkhouse East.PNGby Mike Edstrom, Observatory Director

The new bunkhouse is getting very close to completion. The West room is almost ready for paint as the sheetrock is up and ready for taping. The ceiling sheetrock is up on the East room and progress is being made on the walls. The exterior is ready for covering we hope to have it completed by the end of the year. 2016 Picnic & Open House.PNG

We had a great Open House and Picnic on October 22nd thanks to Stephen Jones and Mario Moreno. Steve Munsey held the first Swap Meet and several items astronomical items were traded or sold.Fall weather is here and the cool dark skies are waiting for you at the Columbus Dark Site. Hope to see you there soon.

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