December 2012

HAS Texas 45 Observing Program

Announcing New Award Level: the HAS Texas 45 Halfway There

So you've been working on your HAS Texas 45 off and on for a few years but you're stuck. The weather, your schedule—fill-in-the-blank. How about a little motivation to get your list kicked off again?

New for 2019 is the HAS Texas 45 Halfway There award. That's right. You can earn a certificate for getting halfway through the list, at least 23 objects. Questions? Contact Rene Gedaly at [email protected]. Here's what the award looks like, suitable for framing:
Hafway There.PNG

** Need a little help finding the easier objects? **
Download the monthly SkyMaps to help you find the brighter list objects: http://www.skymaps.com/downloads.html

What kind of objects will I be looking for?

The Texas 45 is an observing program designed for the motivated novice and intermediate observer so we want to make sure you see a wide variety of objects. The object list includes: planetary nebulae, diffuse nebulae, open star clusters, globular star clusters, galaxies, a carbon star, variable stars, multiple star systems, constellations, solar system objects, and a white dwarf. Special emphasis is placed on southern objects like Omega Centauri, easily viewed from Columbus. How cool is that?

What kind of telescope can I use? How about binoculars?

Any size telescope can be used—GoTo, PushTo, or manual. Binoculars can be used for a number of list objects. A few observations do require at least a 6" aperture telescope. With 60 objects to choose from and only 45 to log, choose the bigger or brighter objects if aperture is a concern.

I’m in! What do I need to do?

  • Observe list objects at the HAS observing site only.
  • Observe at least 10 objects from each season's list. That’s 40 objects, 10 each from winter, spring, summer, and autumn.
  • Observe 5 solar system objects of your choice, any time of year. That makes 45 objects: the HAS Texas 45.
  • Record your observations and send the completed log to the HAS Texas 45 program coordinator.

Special circumstances?

If you’ve already observed some objects at the site, fill out the HAS Texas 45 observation log like usual, estimating when you were at the site. Also, non-members are welcome to work on the list in the company of an HAS member. Special rules may apply.

Do I get an award?

Observers who successfully complete the HAS Texas 45 observing program will be presented both a pin and a certificate of completion at the HAS general membership meeting.

  • Earn the bronze certificate by observing 45 objects, electronic finding aids or go-to telescope okay.
  • Earn the silver certificate by observing either (a) 45 objects using star hopping only, or (b) all 65 objects using go-to or electronic finding aids.
  • Go for the gold by observing all 65 objects using the star hopping method only. Certificates designate the award level; the pin remains the same

.tx45logosmall.jpg               YourNameHere.jpg

    Questions?

    Contact Rene Gedaly at [email protected] with questions about the HAS Texas 45 program. Contact Chris Ober at [email protected] with questions about observatory site operations and observing site log reports.

    The HAS Texas 45 is dedicated to the memory of Bob Rogers.

    Honor Roll

    The following members have completed the HAS Texas 45 observing program. Congratulations!

    • Steve Fast, gold level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #1
    • Rob Torrey, silver level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects, go-to or mix of go-to and star hopping, certificate #2
    • Rene Gedaly, Texas 45 author, gold level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #3
    • Chris Thiede, gold level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #4
    • Amelia Goldberg, silver level award, 40 out of 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #5
    • Craig Lamison, silver level award, 40 out of 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #6
    • Clayton Jeter, gold level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #7
    • Brian Cudnik, silver level award, all 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects, go-to or mix of go-to and star hopping, certificate #8
    • Steve Goldberg, silver level award, 40 out of 60 seasonal objects plus 5 solar system objects via star hopping only, certificate #9
    • Craig Lamison, gold level award, certificate #10. Also certificate #6 for the silver.

    Science Hobbyists Needed for a National Study

    This may be of interest to some club members:

    Are you a science hobbyist? We need your help with a new National Science Foundation sponsored research study that will investigate the characteristics and educational experiences of people who are active in science hobbies. More and more people are engaging in science hobbies; schools and science centers would like to know more about the characteristics of science hobbyists and how these organizations might better support hobbyists’ networking and education.

    January 04, 2013: Monitoring Space Radiation on the ISS

    Novice Meeting: 6:30PM
    Novice Meeting Topic: 
    Life Cycle of Stars, Putting your Observing in Context
    Novice Meeting Speaker: 
    Debbie Moran
    General Meeting: 7:15PM
    General Meeting Topic: 
    Monitoring Space Radiation on the ISS
    General Meeting Speaker: 
    Larry Pinsky
    About the General Meeting Presentation

    The radiation environment in space is very different than anything routinely encountered on Earth. This makes assessing the risk of the exposure problematic, and presents special requirements for dosimetry measurements. Recently, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Group at the University of Houston has engaged in adapting the active pixel detector technology used in the major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland to the development of space radiation detectors. Currently there are 5 such detectors deployed and taking data on the ISS, and evolutions of these basic devices are planned to be used on the upcoming test of the new US manned spacecraft, the Orion module, during its first unmanned test flight. Beyond that, NASA has plans to deploy future incarnations of the technology as personal battery-powered wireless dosimeters and permanent built-in area monitors. Plans are also in the works to use the 5 existing units onboard the ISS to monitor the radiation environment in the test of the first inflatable habitat module.

    Parking and Directions (View Map)

    Meetings are held at the Trini Mendenhall Community Center, which is located at 1414 Wirt Rd, Houson, TX 77055.

    PARKING INFORMATION: Free parking in the lot in front of the TMCC.


    Map to Trini Mendenhall Community Center

    Comets of the Late Autumnal Sky!

    Please look towards the latest edition of the Professor Comet report now posted on the HAS website!

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